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Renault Master van review – big, comfortable workhorse

Story: Colin Dawson | Posted 9 January 2014 | In Renault, Van Reviews, Van Tests

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Renault_Master

Distinctive Renault styling, even though the Master shares a platform with the Vauxhall Movano and Nissan NV400

Renault Master LM35 dCi 125

What is it?

The latest-generation Renault Master, introduced in 2010, shares a platform with the Vauxhall Movano and Nissan NV400.

It’s a substantial van that’s available in panel van, crew van, chassis cab, dropside, tipper, box van, and Luton options.

Our test model was the LM35 dCI 125, with the 125hp 2.3-litre 4-cylinder diesel developing a beefy torque of 310Nm.

Although it naturally has much in common with the Nissan and Vauxhall versions, it is clearly a Renault with the French manufacturer’s stylish lines and well thought-out interior.

Renault_Master

It’s a good, comfortable working environment with plenty of storage

There’s little to fault in the cab. The driver’s seat is height adjustable, and for passengers there a two-person bench seat.

There’s plenty of storage space for paperwork as well as drinks and items and the dual seat offers under-cushion stowage.

With trim level one step up from the ‘Debut’ models, the Debut Special Edition refinements include a 2x20W radio with fingertip control, RCA connection, Bluetooth and USB connectivity, and electrically operated windows and heated doors mirrors. The driver’s seat also gains an armrest.

The Debut Special Edition level adds remote central locking, deadlocking, side marker lights and a multi-functional trip computer.

Top-specification ‘Sport’ models get a 2x20W radio CD MP3 with separate display, fingertip control, RCA connection, Bluetooth and USB (TunePoint) connectivity and Carminat TomTom Live satellite navigation system, as well as body coloured front bumpers and door mirrors.

The cab is separated from the load space by a full-size steel bulkhead. Noise levels are unobtrusive and the driving experience is generally relaxed. You could spend a lot of time behind the wheel without feeling tired.

Instruments and controls are clear and well positioned for the most part, although I wasn’t happy about the sat nav unit, which is where the rear-view mirror would be in a car. For me, it was too much of a distraction from the road ahead.

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